Friday, December 16, 2011

Thick and Easy 1 hour potholder, Version 1 {crochet pattern}

Everyone has seen these potholders, I'm sure that some of you have received them as gifts even.  The mystery is in how they're made.  They're one piece double thickness potholders, and they are super easy!  I've rarely come across patterns for them, as I think they are one of those kind of "word of mouth" patterns...The kind that you learned from so and so, who learned it from her mom, who learned it from her grandma, so on and so forth, you get the idea.

Well, I've been playing with this pattern for some of my holiday gifting and am here to share it with you!

Thick and Easy 1 Hour Potholder, Version 1

Materials:

Copyright 2010-2012 LiLu Studios: This Crafting Life, by Lori Steffens. {http://www.thiscraftinglife.com/} Make it, Wear it, Love it, but above all, Share it, don't Sell it!

Size H hook   
Cotton yarn-  THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT.  Cotton is able to withstand very high heat and will not melt.  It will catch fire if exposed to flame, but it will not melt.  Acrylic yarn will melt when coming into contact with very hot items from the oven and is not to be trusted as an actual useable potholder material.  Acrylic yarn is fine when used for trivets, provided that your dish has cooled slightly prior to being used for it.  I personally used Lily: Peaches and Cream Yarn.  I really like the Peaches and Cream yarn and Sugar and Cream for kitchen items because it gives a thick and durable feel.

Pattern:

{pattern notes}  this pattern is mostly a free form spiraling round pattern.  Do not get hung up on where you are on a row, you can figure out if you are right by laying it as it will go together as shown in the pictures.  You may end your potholder before or after i do, depending on the yarn that you use and the tension of which you crochet.  The important thing is that it meets together as shown in the pictures.
You will not join rounds, instead moving on to sc in the top of the last round directly.

ch 30

Row 1- work 1sc in the 2nd chain, from hook in the back chain only! (see picture)  sc to the end, turn.


Row 2- work 2 sc in what is now the back of the chain, on the opposite side of the last sc of the last row.  work 1 sc in each back chain to the end.(see picture) Add one more sc to last chain.  Do not turn.
*note, piece will begin to curl on ends, and this means you're doing it right.


Round 2- *now rounds will be worked, Row 1 and Row 2 equal the first round. *  sc in back loop of each sc around.


R3-15- sc in back loop of each sc around.

Now while following this pattern, it is advised that once you get to Round 13 or so, you begin laying your piece as it folds naturally.  This way you can see how much of the gap that you need to fill.  Reference the pictures below to see how much difference even just one round can make.  Feel free to add or omit rows as you need to in order to get the seams to line up properly.




Once you're done, you can use any method of seaming that you prefer, but I use a whip stitch with an yarn needle.  If you need ideas or how-to's on seaming, check out this post with nice pictures: How To Seam Crochet

Another note!  Once you understand this pattern, you can make these in any size!  Follow the same formula, but increase your starting chain!  By making it bigger, you can make yourself a bigger potholder!

You can also flip it inside out, and make a different look:

26 comments:

  1. do you leave your seam open? Would these be heavy enough to use as a glove type holder? Putting your fingers in one side and thumb in the other? Hmmmm, got me thinking now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't leave the seam open on these, though I see where you're going with that. You might want to double strand if you try to make a glove type holder out of it, or make two, (one slightly smaller) and insert it inside the other, if it weren't thick enough. Or... you could just make a square and attach it inside the flat square part to make the part you would use for grabbing thicker.... It would take some experimentation, but I'm pretty sure you could get the "glove type" effect from it. Let me know if you do!

      Delete
  2. Thank you. I read someone else's pattern and I got the concept... But they insisted that there was no turning ...... Your pictures helped me a lot. My sister in law got this type of pot holder for a wedding present and they got burned (left on the stove, acrylic yarn.. icky melt spot...) and I wanted to suprise her with some more : ) Thanks Very Much for helping to make that happen!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There isn't turning, in the traditional sense, where you actually turn the piece, it's more of going around in a circle, making a tube in a way. I'm glad this pattern helped you figure it out!!

      Delete
  3. I'd like to thank you for taking the time to work this pattern out and for sharing it! I received two of these potholders many years ago, when I graduated from culinary school. I found these holders to be part of my "kit", along with my kitchen knives, when I started my first job. Needless to say, the potholders went "missing" within a few weeks of starting that job...and I never found another holder I loved as well as those originals. When I saw your pattern on Ravelry, I was making them within five minutes, and I made at least a dozen of them. I shared four of them, and kept the rest for my stash. I'm now teaching cooking to novices, and I'll be giving a set of these holders as a graduation gift!Thank you once again. I know it sounds sappy, but you've really touched a lot of lives with sharing this pattern!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so very welcome! I also have 4 other versions of this pattern using different stitches. This is my favorite out of the bunch though, I think.

      Delete
  4. My mom used to make these with a few slight differences. I am sure she made hundreds, and gave them to us as gifts. I still have ONE left and it is pretty sad looking although still does the job just fine. Mom is now 92 and has both macular degeneration and Alzheimer's, so we thought we'd lost the pattern forever! Thanks so much for giving it back to us. Can't wait to start one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad that I could help out! They're mostly a "passed down from generation to generation" type of pattern, taught and never written. So I wrote it out to help everyone out, and I'm pleased to see how many people it's touched! Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
  5. I am enjoying making the potholders, however, I am confused as to how you joined the last rows together. Sc makes it too bulky...so I will take whatever suggestion you can give. They are fun and quick, to be sure. Thanks for the post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. oh wow! I didn't realize that I didn't talk about how to seam them up!!! big whoops! I'll add a note in the pattern right now, but I use an embroidery needle and just seam them together with a whip stitch. Hope that helps!

      Delete
  6. This is a wonderful, fun pattern to make and to give as gifts. Everyone loves them! Thanks for sharing the pattern.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you so much for sharing this pattern ... my daughter and daughter in law will love them as an addition to the dish cloths I make for them.. A bit of family love passed on to the next generation <3

    ReplyDelete
  8. I have made several of these, only with cotton, and all were well received. What I do is give a dish cloth and scrubbie along with the potholder as a set. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. As a beginner and not understanding mos of the pattern, would you consider making a video? I know how to chain basically and go back into my stitches but don't understand the rest... hangs head...a video would be awesome! Thanks for the consideration.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My grandma's mom made several potholders, but most of them are worn out these days and my grandma asked if I could make her a few since I crochet and knit {though i'm still very new to knitting}. I'll be making a several using this pattern to give to her for Christmas.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I am a new crocheter. I have wanted to find these potholders at a craft show but have not. I thought I can try to do it. I do not understand to "not turn" So what do you do? And when you do turn do you like turn a page? and flip it over. I have tried a few differnt ways that i thought it would go but it does not seem right. I have not given it a real long time or very many rounds and I rip it out and start over but not having luck!! Hope I do not sound too dumb about this! Can you give me any more tips or further explanation? Please and thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Have you ever made a hat where you work in rounds? That's what I mean by it's not a turn, in the true sense, where you would turn, chain and continue to make a flat piece. You're actually making a pocket, or a hat like shape. So think of it as turning as you would flip a cassette tape to work on the other side. Does that help at all?

    ReplyDelete
  13. I would love to know what the yarn is called, I love the color. I looked on Lilly's website but was unable to match a color to it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe this is the right yarn: http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=lilstu0d-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0044O7UOC

      Delete
  14. how big is this suppose to end up being? I am making it now and it doesn't seem like its going to end up being very big...by the way, I do love the pattern and have been looking for something like this....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. However long your first chain was will be the length of the potholder measuring from opposing corners and subtracting a very small amount for the thickness. So, if you want it larger, just try chaining on more in the beginning. :)

      Delete
  15. Thank you Lilu, this is the best potholder pattern. I use to have it years ago and thought it would make a nice addition to my Christmas gifts this year. Bought the yarn in Christmas colors came home and couldn't find the pattern and couldn't remember how it was done. Searched the internet and found one but it was poorly written and couldn't understand it. Then a few days later came across yours that is written very well. Thank You So Much

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks for warning not to use acrylic yarn for this, I was just about to!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I have done several of these but mine always turn out to be a square. My grandmother used to make them into a rectangle shape. Can you tell me how to do that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm.... I've not tried to make a rectangle before! I'm working on holiday gifts right now and perhaps I'll give it a go! If it works, I'll make a post on it! :)

      Delete
  18. Thank you so much for the pattern. I got these pot holders as gifts many years ago and always wanted to make one for my family. Now I can, thanks again.

    ReplyDelete

247086_TV episodes & movies instantly streaming from Netflix. Start your FREE trial!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Blogger Wordpress Gadgets